Outside the marginals

a commentary on the politics that followed the UK 2010 & 2015 elections

Archive for the category “National Sovereignty”

Theresa’ Dictionary: Successful Brexit

Every empress, or prospective emperor (or empress), has to give the appearance of having “the common touch”. In view of the restricted background of our new empress, I offer her a dictionary in the hope that studying it will help her understand the people she wishes to rule.

Successful Brexit

Read more…

Great May! She’s cracked it: A Great Bill

We were told that the EU was terrible because it stopped us being a sovereign state. We voted to leave.

Now it appears that we can regain this sovereignty by our (non sovereign) parliament voting for a Great Repeal Bill.

The referendum has obviously had a positive result. It got rid of David Can’t and got us Theresa May. She has cracked it!

Read more…

Post “The Day” Reflections

Ok, I think it’s a disaster and I am livid at what I see as the way both campaigns – but particularly Leave’s – were run. (Remain was inept, but Leave at times seemed deliberately devious.) If I had been active in the campaign I would also be feeling sore.
But the deed is done and we have to accept the result even if we can’t respect it. But there are a number of issues that bear closer examination.

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England’s Confused Nationalism (1. Sport and Athems)

During the Summer of 2014 Democratic Audit ran a series of posts about the (English) National Anthem in response to Roy Hodgson’s call for England players to sing the National Anthem at the World Cup (An Association Football Championship, m’lud).

The issue of course is that the Anthem in question is “God Save the Queen” – one of the hardest working Anthems in the songbook as it fills the following roles:

  • National Anthem for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
  • Salute for the Head of State of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland (and other Realms)
  • Default Anthem for some (not all) England sporting teams (most notably the Association Football and Rugby Union Teams)

I have always found this odd, reflecting the confused national identity of England and indeed the United Kingdom. Given that the Scots (or more accurately, those in Scotland) have had a thorough examination of their national identity, perhaps England may reflect on its sporting identity as a preliminary warm-up to a more thorough review.

In the new year (2016) Chesterfield MP Toby Perkins intends to bring his English National Anthem Bill to Parliament on 13 January.

Read more…

Steeling ourselves for industrial collapse

Administrators from PwC have been appointed to run some parts of the Caparo group empire. …

Steel giant Tata is expected to announce major job losses on Tuesday. Recently the UK’s second largest steelmaker, SSI, went into liquidation. …

Matt Hammond, lead administrator [of Caparo] and partner at PwC, said: “This is a significant business with a wide range of interests across steel, engineering, vehicles products and technologies. Its scale and reach into significant customers and its importance to suppliers cannot be understated. We will be rapidly assessing all options for the businesses through this week and beyond.”
BBC News website, 19 October 2015 : Caparo steel goes into partial administration

There are numerous reasons for the problems, but there seems to be only one reason for the collapse of this industry; Read more…

Neverendum?

Nicola Sturgeon has threatened to demand a second independence referendum unless David Cameron reverses his welfare cuts and halts plans to renew Trident.
The Guardian, 18 September 2015 : Sturgeon: scrap cuts and Trident or face another vote on independence

Cameron, however, dismissed her challenge. The prime minister said the nationalist quest for separation was an “obsession” that ignored the clear and decisive vote in last year’s referendum for Scotland to remain part of the UK with a strong Scottish parliament. ibid

Is the requirement for constitutional stability such that the conditions for a referendum can only occur “once a generation”? Read more…

Force of Numbers

Are we about to see an example of governments’ hands being forced by pure force of numbers?

Hungarian riot police have fired tear gas [into Serbia] and water cannon to force migrants back from the Serbia-Hungary border.

Hundreds of people have massed at a closed crossing point near the Serbian town of Horgos, and are involved in a tense stand-off with police on the other side of the border.

Some migrants threw missiles, including stones and water bottles.
BBC News Website, 16 September 2015 : Migrant crisis: Clashes at Hungary-Serbia border

We have seen tear gas and water cannon used, but these migrants (the type of migration and reason for migration is immaterial) have committed a lot of time and money to get this far, have endured numerous deprivations and believe that within the EU there lies a better life. They may also have a different attitude to the sanctity of borders – seeing them as artificial constructs imposed by others rather than our view of a border defining our land.

What happens when say a thousand Syrians rush a Serbian-Hungarian border post?

Are we prepared to see the use of bullets? Read more…

Migrant Miopia; Cuts and Fences

… the Home Office said support could end for failed asylum-seekers, to discourage illegal migration.

Bolstered security measures planned for around the French end of the Channel Tunnel, which include more CCTV surveillance, French police reinforcements and extra fencing, were agreed in a phone call between Prime Minister David Cameron and President Francois Hollande on Friday.
BBC News Website 2 August 2015 : Calais migrant crisis: UK and France urge EU action

And Cameron really thinks that a poor potential economic migrant in Sudan or a terrified potential asylum seeker in Syria will really be “discouraged” by such steps? Read more…

Scotland: Again?

If the Edinburgh Pandas do give birth to a single cub – there will be as many Pandas in Scotland as there are Labour, Liberal and Conservative MPs combined.

But how much of a tizzy should we get into about this (sensational) result and how should the UK Parliament respond? Read more…

Grexit: Wrong Problem?

In another of his periodic pronouncements Robert Peston ponders the possibility and impact of a Greek Exit from the Euro. His conclusion includes:

… an exacerbation of the Greek crisis would be an inconvenience for Britain. But by no means a disaster.

That said, the Treasury fears that Greek exit would be more damaging to the medium-term sustainability of the euro than most of the eurozone establishment apparently believes right now – in that it would prove the euro is not forever.

The euro would be turned into a glorified Deutschmark peg: speculators would have a big incentive to bet on who will be next to leave the currency; and history (the ERM for example) shows those bets can be self-fulfilling.
BBC News Website 5 may 2015 : How vulnerable would new UK government be to Grexit?

It’s the last paragraph that is the give-away. Read more…

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