Outside the marginals

A commentary on the politics that followed the UK 2010, 2015 & 2017 elections (and THAT referendum)

Archive for the category “GE 2015”

Conservatives: Strike 1

Newly appointed business secretary Sajid Javid has said there will be “significant changes” to strike laws under the new Conservative government.

A strike affecting essential public services will need the backing of 40% of eligible union members under government plans, he said.
BBC News Website 12 May 2015 : Sajid Javid: Significant changes to strike law

Not unexpected but Read more…

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Do you trust the Polls

The BBC has an interesting post-mortem item on the polls and why they (the pollsters) got it wrong.

So I wonder: Read more…

Scotland: Again?

If the Edinburgh Pandas do give birth to a single cub – there will be as many Pandas in Scotland as there are Labour, Liberal and Conservative MPs combined.

But how much of a tizzy should we get into about this (sensational) result and how should the UK Parliament respond? Read more…

End of Term Report: Labour

Labour lost the last election (like all the other parties) and did not go into government – so they have not been able to keep any of their promises (something the Liberals seem incapable of pointing out).  The maths of majority coalition government also makes it very difficult for the opposition to claim much success in blocking policy.

So it is a matter of looking at how well they have handled the politics. Read more…

End of Term Report: Liberal Democrats

The Liberal Democrats, possibly slightly to their surprise found themselves holding the balance of power at the last election and that led to them going into coalition. So how have they done in the last five years?

How do we measure what they have done? On one hand we can measure “how well they have governed” – if we can agree what we mean by “well”. On the other hand we can look at it from the point of view of raw politics. Read more…

End of Term Report: Conservatives

The Conservatives did not win a majority at the last election. So how have they done in the last five years?

How do we measure what they have done? On one hand we can measure “how well they have governed” – if we can agree what we mean by “well”. On the other hand we can look at it from the point of view of raw politics.

Read more…

BBC Bias? “Legitimacy”

The BBC is making much of what they are calling the struggle for legitimacy. By this they imply that the biggest minority in the new parliament is by default the “legitimate government”. Whilst the bulletins are pushing this line Nick Robinson is a bit more nuanced:

So, what is obsessing politicians of all parties behind-the-scenes is the debate about what a legitimate government would look like.

You might think that’s simple – one led by the winning party – but think again. In politics things aren’t nearly so neat and simple as that. …

So, what are the competing arguments?

1. A legitimate government is led by the party which “wins” – ie wins the most MPs and votes …

2. A legitimate government is one supported by a majority of MPs (of whatever party) …

3. A legitimate government must be backed by all parts of the UK
BBC News Website 5 May 2015 : Election 2015: And the winner is? Er…

This is so muddled-headed. Read more…

What about the Elephants?

This (2015 UK) General Election seems to consist of lots of minor and pretty irrelevant skirmishes. The major issues seem to be un-addressed in the election.

So what are these elephants in the room? Read more…

All in it together

A personal fortune of £100m is now required to become one of the 1,000 richest people in the country, up £15m compared with last year’s entry point of £85m.

In 1997 it took a fortune of just £15m to join Britain’s richest 1,000 people.
BBC News Website 26 April 2015 : Music boss Len Blavatnik named as Britain’s richest man

What does this annual reporting of the Sunday Times Rich List? Read more…

Scottish Options

The old elitist parties are getting in a right tizzy about the prospect of the Scottish National Party holding the balance of power in the next Parliament.

But they only have themselves to blame. Read more…

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